UKIP Poster Graffiti

 

A graffitied UKIP poster for the upcoming European elections for MEP representatives in England. Seen on the B1062 between Bungay and Beccles.

Some polls are indicating that UKIP could enjoy a “landslide” victory in the 22nd May elections, with Nigel Farage’s party taking advantage of Euroscepticism and the perceived ineffectiveness of Britain’s mainstream political parties by offering a so-called “Common Sense” ‘populist’ protest vote against the British political establishment and the EU. A cornerstone of UKIP’s policies rest on tackling the perceived ‘threat’ of “excessive immigration”, which the party claim is “crippling local services”.

UKIP’s anti-immigration stance has proved controversial though, with the party’s national billboard campaign in particular receiving lots of media coverage. The most unsettling of these billboard designs features an Orwellian-esque pointing finger accompanied by the legend “26 Million People in Europe are looking for work. And whose jobs are they after?”. Labour Party MP Mike Gapes branded the campaign “racist” and “xenophobic”, and accused UKIP of seeking “to win votes by whipping up animosity against foreigners living and working and contributing to this country.”

There have also been several allegations of sexist remarks attributed to UKIP members. The most high-profile incident concerned Godfrey Bloom’s mocking use of the word “sluts” to describe women attending a UKIP conference, which resulted in him quitting his position as a UKIP whip, though he remains an MEP and member of the party. UKIP treasurer Stuart Wheeler denied allegations of sexism after making a comment about women’s “competitiveness” in relation to men.

Independent: ‘UKIP set for landmark win’

UKIP ‘Common Sense’ Manifestos

UKIP Immigration Video

UKIP 2014 Manifesto

UKIP National Billboard Campaign

New Statesman: ‘Why I say UKIP posters are racist’

Telegraph: ‘UKIP’s sexism is no laughing matter’

BBC: Godfrey Bloom quits as UKIP MEP after ‘sluts’ joke row

Independent: ‘Ukip faces renewed accusations of sexism’

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UKIP Poster Graffiti

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